Humboldt Amateur Radio Club Website

(SAME CLUB, SAME WEBSITE, DIFFERENT LOOK)
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Humboldt Amateur Radio Club - "IT'S WHERE THE FUN IS!"


Humboldt Amateur Radio Club
was  Established in 1947

W6ZZK is the club call sign used for on-air activities and contests/events.

The Humboldt Amateur Radio Club  meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 7PM
 at the Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 406 11th St., Eureka, California (Muni uilding - enter from 11th St.  side - the old Red Cross office.)

Club Repeaters:
Eureka    145.470 MHz
Rainbow Ridge    146.910 MHz
Offset: -600 KHz | Tone: 103.5

Postal mailing address:
Humboldt Amateur Radio Club
PO Box 5251
Eureka, CA 95502-5251

Club Dues are $25 per year for individuals $30 for a family of hams under the same roof.  There is a membership application on this website.  Click the link in the heading for a printale PDF of the application, which is self-explanatory. 




Website of the Humboldt Amateur Radio Club, Eureka, Ca

Humboldt Amateur Radio Club

 "IT'S WHERE THE FUN IS!"




WHAT WE DO:

MONTHLY HARC CLUB MEETINGS - 1ST TUESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT 7PM LOCAL TIME, AT OUR CLUBHOUSE INSIDE THE MUNI BUILDING, 604 11TH ST, EUREKA CA (FORMER RED CROSS OFFICE, ENTER ON 11TH ST. SIDE). MONTHLY CLUB MEETINGS USUALLY START WITH A BRIEF BUSINESS MEETING, FOLLOWED BY A BREAK WITH SNACKS AND A RAFFLE, AFTER WHICH THERE IS A PROGRAM OR FURTHER DISCUSSION ON CLUB ACTIVITIES.

SECOND TUESDAY WORKSHOPS HAPPEN REGULARLY, AND THE PRESENTERS ARE USUALLY CLUB MEMBERS SPEAKING ON A PARTICULAR ASPECT OF HAM RADIO. SEE LISTINGS ELSEWHERE ON THIS WEBSITE.  

ON THE AIR ACTIVITIES:
EMERGENCY PREP/TESTS IN THE FORM OF WEEKLY SCHEDULES AND NETS (SEE OUR NORTH COAST NETS AND EVENTS PAGES FOR A LIST OF THESE AND OTHER ON-AIR ACTIVITIES).  WE ALSO USE THE HARC CLUB REPEATER, W6ZZK / R, WHICH IS OPERATIIONAL 24/7 ON 145.470MHZ, -600KHZ OFFSET, 103.5HZ SUB-TONE. THE REPEATER COVERS MOST OF CENTRAL HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CA AND IS LOCATED AT OUR CLUB HOUSE WITH THE ANTENNA ON THE ROOF (OF THE EUREKA MUNI AUDITORIUM) BUILDING).  BEYOND WEEKLY EQUIPMENT TESTS, WE USE THIS REPEATER WHEN WE DO PUBLIC SERVICE BY PROVIDING COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANCE FOR VARIOUS PUBLIC EVENTS , MARATHONS, PARADES, ETC.

A WEEKLY HARC NET MEETS ON THE AIR MOST THURSDAYS AT 7P.M. LOCAL TIME ON THE CLUB REPEATER TO TEST OUR PERSONAL EQUIPMENT AND OPERATOR READINESS TO PASS MESSAGES IN TIMES OF NEED.   AFTER ANNOUNCEMENTS AND ROLL CALL, A GENERAL OPEN SESSION IS HELD, WHERE WE ENCOURAGE TECHNICAL QUESTIONS, ELMERING (HAM MENTORING) AND OTHER HAM RADIO QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS AND GENERAL INTEREST CONVERSATIONS.

INFORMAL TUESDAY ALL HAMS LUNCH GET TOGETHERS HAPPEN AT THE PNTRY RESTAURANT, 1912 BROADWAY IN EUREKA IN THE MEETING ROOM OF THE RESTAURANT (ENTER THROUGH MAIN FRONT DOOR ON BROADWAY.  

WE GET OUT AND ABOUT AND OFF-GRID - ON A FREQUENT BASIS, THE CLUB GETS TOGETHER AT A REMOTE LOCATION TO SET UP AN OFF-GRID HAM RADIO STATION.  OFTEN THIS IS IN CONNECTION WITH A CONTEST OR ACTIVITY THAT COENCIDES WITH OTHER HAMS ELSEWHERE DOING THE SAME THING.  SUCH ACTIVITIES TEST OUR CAPABILITIES FOR OPERATING OUTSIDE THE COMFORT OF OUR OWN HOMES, AND PROVIDE PRACTICE FOR COMMUNICATIONS IN TIMES OF EMERGENCY OR DISASTER.  


THE HUMBOLDT AMATEUR RADIO CLUB HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERY HAM OR ANYONE HOPING TO BECOME A LICENSED HAM RADIO OPERATOR.


WE OFFER CLUB ACTIVITIES FOR MEMBERS AND OTHER HAMS AND ALSO OFFER CLASSES FOR THOSE WANTING TO PREPARE FOR A LICENSE EXAM. EXAMS ARE ALSO OFFERED BY OUR VOLUNTEER EXAMINATION CORPS. VISIT OUR EVENTS PAGE FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION ON CLASSES AND EXAMS.


One of the things we do to have fun in ham radio is to get outside and operate off-grid.  We have a video of one such occasion:

In June of 2017, the Club made a trip out to Woodley Island in Humboldt Bay Eureka, Ca, to set up for Field Day.  Each year, the AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE (ARRL) sponsors an event designed to get hams out of their comfort zon and into the field to practice communicating off-grid under disaster conditions.  Each station tries to make as many contacts as possible in a 24 hour period (yes, overnight).  A video, made by Howard Lang, KB6NN, is below this paragraph.  Thinking ahead, why not join us on the last full weekend in June each year when we participate in the annual ARRL Field Day.  Our most common location for Field Day is Woodley Island.  Field Day is the most popular ARRL operating event.  Participated in by over 30,000 amateurs in a typical year, Field Day is the largest single amateur radio emergency preparedness exercise in the country (source: Wikipedia),  


HERE IS THE Field Day VIDEO (2017):


The next video below is interesting because each year, Humboldt Amateur Radio Club has many outdoor activities, not just Field Day. Hams seem to like setting up in various outdoor locations to operate portable under emergency conditions to test their readiness for operation in times of emergency. We also participate in emergency preparedness when we volunteer as communicators for local events such as marathons and parades.  In 2016, there was a year-long exercise in off-grid operation.  The event commemorated centinnials for both the ARRL and National Parks. Our club members participated in National Parks On The Air (NPOTA), as depicted in the vdeo below, which was made by Jim Armstrong, KW7JIM, our club president at the time.


 

As you watch the video, you will see our various people, antennas, radios, solar and battery power.  What's to see?  A few ham operators from the club out and about playing radio.  Partway through, is a satellite contact.  there are many ham satellites.  Usually small things that have short ranges.  

In the satellite segment, around 4:00 in the video, we begin the satellite portion of the "activation", continuing through about 5:30 on the video, where Howard Lang, KB6NN, is holding the handle on the directional satellite antenna used to contact other hams within the "umbrella" of the satellite's reach (at this time in the video, the Western U.S.A. is covered by the satellite, which is the Saudi satellite SO-50. Around 5:00 in the video, Kai Wagner, N6ZZO, is handling the microphone. According to Anthony Wiese, KG6LHW, "Satellites are sexy", so we often set up a satellite comms rig when we are out in public because it tends to attract attention, and questions. When we set up for a public event, we usually bring handouts, license class schedules and exam schedules.  And yes, you can talk on the radio, as long as a licensed ham is in control of the radio and gives proper station IDs.  Just ask.  So now you need to know where we will be and when.  We usually send out a press release to local media if we are about to hold a public event.  Usually, we also post it on our website as well.  


Not big like the AT&T or other major communications satellites, these ham satellites are put up in the air as secondary payloads, often teamed up with university student projects in astrophysics.  From the ground, we can not only hear what the satellites are transmitting, but if one of them has a repeater or transponder, we can "bounce our transmission" off the satellite and talk with other hams that can also "see" the satellite from where they are.  "This all seems way above my pay grade."  Well, actually, since our commnication needs are small compared with big compnies like Verizon or AT&T.  A ham can use a ham satellite the same way they use a mountaintop ham repeater or transponder.  Those devices, put up by private individuals or ham clubs, are a way for hams to get their signal a better range than line-of-sight would give them.  They "bounce" their signal through the mountaintop repeater to some ham on the other side of the mountain.  "Can't you just use a cell phone?"  Well, yes, you could, but where's the challenge in that?  

So, back to the video: The satellite comms rig seen in the video consists of an inexpensive handheld radio ($20 to $200, depending on quality and features), an inexpensive photographic tripod (low-end tripods run around $20-$30), and finally, a directional antenna (store bought for under $100 or home-built with scrapyard parts for a few dollars), scrapyard parts are cheap, but you can buy a commercially made directiional antenna, where prices vary widely.  Look up "directional antenna". The directional antenna is "steered" or "aimed" the way you would steer or aim a video camera to follow the movement of your subject. You steer the antenna toward the satellite as it passes over your location.  The path of the satellite is known in advance.  Visit amsat.org to learn about satellite path data and about amateur radio aboard the International Space Station. The satelite communications rig we used, shown in the video above, is owned by Anthony Wiese, KG6LHW. This is the same guy who decorated his travel trailer by painting the sides with the artwork copied from the California state flag (he's really creative). The event in the video is the National Parks On The Air (NPOTA) event.  NPOTA was a year-long adventure conducted in 2016 by the American Radio Relay League, commemorating a centennial for both the ARRL and the National Parks. Hams all over the country participated in this year-long event, taking to the road to visit National Parks and Monuments, to "activate" each location by making at least ten contacts on any band on any mode available to amateur radio operators morse code through satellite digital. This is the video of one of those National Park activations, Redwood National Park, designated "NP-47":  We used long wire antennas on shortwave (we call it HF for High Frequency) using voice, code, data, and other transmission techniques.  We contacted many other ham stations that were at National Parks or National Monuments.  



The Next video (below) is the video of the activity that launched our club's recent outdoor adventures.  Antnony, KG6LHW, and Jim, KW6JIM, had been talking about setting up off-grid ham radio statiions out and about at public locations for some time.  The boat ramp at the North Jetty of Humboldt Bay was selected for our first outing because it was easy to get to, had plenty of parking, picnic tables, running water, and a bathroom. Below, is a video from that adventure, shot and edited by Jim, KW6JIM.

The video begins with a slide of Anthony operating a battery-powered radio from a table at water's edge, then Jim interviews Anthony about his homebrew potato launcher, which we watch in action (using compressed air from a compressor run by a portable A/C generator). The launcher is designed to launch potatos, but it can be used by hams to send a string or light rope or paracord up and over a tall tree in order to pull up a lightweight wire to be used as an antenna for off-grid field operation. No tall trees on the jetty, but it was fun to watch - you get the idea.

The video ends with views of our solar-powered club field station, and finally, a view north from Table Bluff, showing the jetties of Humoldt Bay and our beautiful coastline.



Watch These and other HARC videos on Youtube here: (HARC YouTube Channel).


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